The Pew Religious Landscape Report: Complications and Questions

Interesting nuanced initial interpretation of the Pew study. This study will provide part of the foundation for a class I’ll team teach with a friend next Spring.

Sociological Reflections

Last Tuesday, the good folks at the Pew Research Center released their report on America’s Religious Landscape. Predictably, the internet went crazy. Some argued that the growth in the nonaffiliated marked the end of Christianity. Others argued that this was actually good news for evangelicals because they didn’t suffer losses are great as other religious groups. Still others used the data to continue the never-ending saga of “mainline hemorrhage”.

I watched all this from a bit of a remove because it was finals week and I had a pile of grading. But I submitted grades for my last class this morning, which freed me to explore these questions for myself. I don’t have access to the 2014 Pew data (if someone wants to give me access, I’d be thrilled!), so I played around with the 2007 Pew Religious Landscape data to test some assumptions.

What I’ve explored below are the…

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Posted on May 19, 2015, in Spiritual Formation. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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